Speakers & Talks

         KEYNOTE          
6 pm - 8 pm
Journey towards the Confidential Cloud
Shubhra Sinha
Microsoft, USA
Mark Russinovich
Mark Russinovich
CTO, Microsoft Azure
         KEYNOTE          
6 pm - 8 pm
Welcome Session and Introduction to Confidential Computing

Welcome to OC3! In this session, we'll outline the agenda for the day and give an introduction to confidential computing. We'll assess the current state of the confidential-computing space and compare it to last year's. We'll take a look at key problems that still require attention. We'll close with an announcement from Edgeless Systems.

Shubhra Sinha
Microsoft, USA
Felix Schuster
Felix Schuster
Edgeless Systems
Cloud-Native
Confidential Containers: Bringing Confidential Computing to the Kubernetes Workload Masses

The new Confidential Computing security frontier is still out of reach for most cloud-native applications.The Confidential Containers project aims at closing that gap by seamlessly running unmodified Kubernetespod workloads through their own, dedicated Confidential Computing environments.

Description

Confidential Computing expands the cloud threat model into a drastically different paradigm. In a worldwhere more and more cloud native applications run through hybrid clouds, not having to trust your cloudprovider anymore is a very powerful and economically attractive proposal. Unfortunately, the currentconfidential computing cloud offerings and architectures are either limited in scope, workload intrusive orprovide node level isolation only. In contrast, the Confidential Containers open-source project integratesthe Confidential Computing security promise directly into cloud native applications by allowing anyKubernetes pod to run into its own, exclusive trusted execution environment.

This presentation will start with describing the Confidential Containers software architecture. We will showhow it's reusing some of the hardware-virtualization based Kata Containers software stack components tobuild confidential micro-VMs for Kubernetes workloads to run into. We will explain how those micro-VMscan transparently leverage the latest Confidential Computing hardware implementations like Intel TDX,AMD SEV or IBM SE to fully protect pod data while it's in use.

Going into more technical details, we will go through several key components of the ConfidentialContainers software stack like the Attestation Agent, the container image management Rust crates or theKubernetes operator. Overall we will show how those components integrate together to form a softwarearchitecture that verifies and attest tenant workloads which pull and run encrypted container images ontop of encrypted memory only.

The final parts of the presentation will first expand into the project roadmap and where it wants to go afterits initial release. Then we will conclude with a mandatory demo of a Kubernetes pod being run on its owntrusted execution environment, on top of an actual Confidential Computing enabled machine.

Samuel Ortiz
Apple
Apps & Solutions
6 pm - 8 pm
Confidential Computing in German E-Prescription Service

Description

Approximately 500 million medical prescriptions are issued, dispensed, and procured each year in Germany. gematik is legally mandated to develop the involved processes into their digital form within its public digital infrastructure (Telematikinfrastruktur). Due to the staged development of these processes as well as to their variable collaborative nature involving medical professionals, patients, pharmacists, and insurance companies a centralized approach for data processing was chosen since it provides adequate design flexibility. In this setup data protection regulations require any processed medical data to be reliably protected from unauthorized access from within the operating environment of the service. Consequently, the solution is based on Intel SGX as Confidential Computing technology. This talk introduces the solution, focusing on trusted computing base, attestation, and availability requirements.

Shubhra Sinha
Microsoft, USA
Andreas Berg
Gematik
6 pm - 8 pm, Meeting Room A
6 pm - 8 pm, Meeting Room A
Apps & Solutions
Proof of Being Forgotten: Verified Privacy Protection in Confidential Computing Platform

For data owners, whether their data has been erased after use is questionable and needs to be proved even when executing in a TEE. We introduce security proof by verifying that sensitive data only lives inside TEE and is guaranteed of being erased after use. We call it proof of being forgotten.

Description

One main goal of Confidential Computing is to guarantee that the security and privacy of data in use areunder the protection of a hardware-based Trusted Execution Environment (TEE). The Trusted ExecutionEnvironment protects the content (code and data) inside the TEE is not accessible from outside. However,as for data owners, whether their sensitive data has been intendedly or un-intendedly leaked by the codeinside TEE is still questionable and needs to be proved. In this talk, we'd like to introduce the concept ofProof of Being Forgotten (PoBF). What PoBF provides is a security proof. The enclaves with the PoBF canensure users that they have the property that sensitive data only live inside an SGX enclave and will beerased after use. By verifying the property and presenting a report with proof of being forgotten to dataowners, the complete data lifecycle protected by TEE can be strictly controlled, enforced, and auditable.

Mingshen Sun
Baidu
cloud-native
Kubernetes meets confidential computing - the different ways of scaling sensitive workloads

Cloud-native and confidential computing will inevitably grow together. This talk maps the design space for confidential Kubernetes and shows the latest corresponding developments from Edgeless Systems.

Description

Kubernetes is the most popular platform for running workloads at scale in a cloud-native way. With the help of confidential computing, Kubernetes deployments can be made verifiable and can be shielded from various threats. The simplest approach towards "confidential Kubernetes" is to run containers inside enclaves or confidential VMs. While this simple approach may look compelling on the surface, on closer inspection, it does not provide great benefits and leaves important questions unanswered:How to set up confidential connections between containers? How to verify the deployment from the outside? How to scale? How to do updates? How to do disaster recovery?

In this talk, we will map the solution space for confidential Kubernetes and discuss pros and cons of the different approaches. In this context, we will give an introduction to our open-source tool MarbleRun, which is a control plane for SGX-based confidential Kubernetes. We will show how MarbleRun, in conjunction with our other open-source tools EGo and EdgelessDB, can make existing cloud-native apps end-to-end confidential.

We will also discuss the additional design options for confidential Kubernetes that are enabled by confidential VM technologies like AMD SEV, Intel TDX, or AWS Nitro. In this context, we will introduce and demo our upcoming product Constellation, which uses confidential VMs o create "fully confidential" Kubernetes deployments, in which all of Kubernetes runs inside confidential environments. Constellation is an evolution of MarbleRun that strikes a different balance between ease-of-use and TCB size.

Moritz Eckert
Edgeless Systems
Apps & Solutions
SGX-protected Scalable Confidential AI for ADAS Development

Privacy is an important aspect of AI applications. We combine Trusted Execution Environments, a library OS, and a scalable service mesh for confidential computing to achieve these security guarantees for Tensorflow-based inference and training with minimal performance and porting overheads.

Description

Access to data is a crucial requirement for the development of advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) based on Artificial Intelligence (AI). However, security threats, strict privacy regulations, and potential loss of Intellectual Property (IP) ownership when collaborating with partners can turn data into a toxic asset (Schneier, 2016): Data leaks can result in huge fines and in damage to brand reputation. An increasingly diverse regulatory landscape imposes significant costs on global companies. Finally, ADAS development requires close collaboration across original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and suppliers. Protecting IP in such settings is both necessary and challenging.
Privacy-Enhancing Technologies (PETs) can alleviate all these problems by increasing control over data. In this paper, we demonstrate how Trusted Execution Environments (TEEs) can be used to lower the aforementioned risks related to data toxicity in AI pipelines used for ADAS development. Contributions
The three most critical success factors for applying PETs in the automotive domain are low overhead in terms of performance and efficiency, ease of adoption, and the ability to scale. ADAS development projects are major efforts generating infrastructure costs in the order of tens to hundreds of millions. Hence, even moderate efficiency overheads translate into significant cost overhead. Before the advent of Intel 3rd Generation XEON Scalable Processors (Ice Lake), the overhead of SGX protected CPU-based training of a TensorFlow model was up to 3-fold when compared to training on the same CPU without using SGX. In a co-engineering effort, Bosch Research and Intel have been able to effectively eliminate these overheads.

In addition, ADAS development happens on complex infrastructures designed to meet highest demands in terms of storage space and compute power. Major changes to these systems for implementing advanced security measures would be prohibitive in terms of time and effort. We demonstrate that Gramine’s (Tsai, Porter, & Vij, 2017) Lift and Shift approach keeps the effort for porting existing workloads to SGX minimal. Finally, being able to process millions of video sequences consisting of billions of frames in short development cycles necessitates a scalable infrastructure. By using the MarbleRun (Edgeless Systems GmbH, 2021) confidential service mesh, Kubernetes can be transformed into a substrate for confidential computing at scale.

To demonstrate the validity of our approach, Edgeless Systems and Bosch Research jointly implemented a proof-of-concept implementation of an exemplary ADAS pipeline using SGX, MarbleRun and Gramine as part of the Open Bosch venture client program.

Stefan Gehrer
Bosch
Scott Raynor
Intel
Moritz Eckert
Edgeless Systems
low-level magic
AMD Secure Nested Paging with Linux - Development Update

Support for AMD Secure Nested Paging (SNP) for Linux is under heavy development. There is work ongoing to make Linux run as an SNP guest and to host SNP protected virtual machines. I will explain the key concepts of SNP and talk about the ongoing work and the directions being considered to enable SNP support in the Linux kernel and the higher software layers. I will also talk about proposed attestation workflows and their implementation.

Jörg Rödel
Suse
Apps & Solutions
Confidential Computing Governance

Regulated institutions have strong business reasons to invest in confidential computing. As with any new technology, governance takes center stage. This talk explores the vast landscape of considerations involved in provably and securely operationalizing Confidential Computing in the public cloud.

Download the accompanying paper here.

Description

Heavily regulated institutions have a strong interest in strengthening protections around data entrusted to public clouds. Confidential Computing is an area that will be of great interest in this context. Securing data in use raises a significantly larger number of questions around proving the effectiveness of new security guarantees -- significantly more than either securing data-in-transit or data-at-rest.

Curiously, this topic has so far received no attention in CCC, or IETF, or anywhere else that we're aware of.

This talk will propose a taxonomy of confidential computing governance and break the problem space down into several constituent domains, with requirements listed for each. Supply chain and toolchain considerations, controls matrices, control plane governance, attestation and several other topics will be discussed.

Mark Novak
JPMorgan Chase
low-level magic
Transparent Release Process for Releasing Verifiable Binaries

Binary attestation allows a remote machine (e.g., a server) to attest that it is running a particular binary. However, usually, the other party (e.g., a client) is interested in guarantees about properties of the binary. We present a release process that allows checking claims about the binaries.

Description

Project Oak provides a trusted runtime and a generic remote attestation protocol for a server to prove its identity and trustworthiness to its clients. To do this, the server, running inside a trusted execution environment (TEE), sends TEE-provided measurements to the client. These measurements include the cryptographic hash of the server binary signed by the TEE’s key. This is called binary attestation.

However, the cryptographic hash of the binary is not sufficient for making any guarantees about the security and trustworthiness of the binary. What is really desired is semantic remote attestation that allows attestation to the properties of a binary. However these approaches are expensive, as they require running checks (e.g., a test suite) during the attestation handshake.

We propose a release process to fill in this gap by adding transparency to binary attestation. For transparency, the release process publishes all released binaries in a public and externally maintained verifiable log. Once an entry has been added to the log, it can never be removed or changed. So a client, or any other interested party (e.g., a trusted external verifier or auditor), can find the binary in the verifiable log. Finding the binary in the verifiable log is important for the client as it gives the client the possibility to detect, with higher likelihood, if it is interacting with a malicious server. Having a public verifiable log is important as it supports public scrutiny of the binaries.

In addition, we are implementing an ecosystem to provide provenance claims about released binaries. We use SLSA provenance predicates for specifying provenance claims. Every entry in the verifiable log corresponding to a released binary contains a provenance claim, cryptographically signed by the team or organization releasing the binary. The provenance claim specifies the source code and the toolchain for building the binary from source. The provenance details allow reproducing server binaries from the source, and verifying (or more accurately falsifying) security claims about the binaries by inspecting the source, its dependencies, and the build toolchain.

Razieh Behjati
Google
cloud-native
Project Veraison - Verification of Attestation

OSS Project Veraison builds software components that can be used to create Attestation Verification services required to establish that a CC environment is trustworthy. These flexible & extensible components can be used to address multiple Attestation technologies and deployment options.

Description

Establishing that a Confidential Computing environment is trustworthy requires the process of Attestation. Verifying the evidential claims in an attestation report can be a complex process, requiring knowledge of token formats and access to a source of reference data that may only be available from a manufacturing supply chain.

Project Veraison (VERificAtIon of atteStatiON) addresses these complexities by building software components that can be used to create Attestation Verification services.

This session discusses the requirements to determine that an environment is trustworthy, the mechanisms of attestation and how Project Veraison brings consistency to the problems of appraising technology specific attestation reports and connecting to the manufacturing supply chain where the reference values of what is 'good' reside.

Simon Frost
Arm
Thomas Fossati
Arm
Apps & Solutions
From zero to hero: making Confidential Computing accessible

How can we make Confidential Computing accessible, so that developers from all levels can quickly learn and use this technology? In this session, we welcome three Outreachy interns, who had zero knowledge of Confidential Computing, to showcase what they've developed in just a few months.

Description

Implementing state-of-the-art Confidential Computing is complex, right? Developers must understand how Trusted Execution Environments work (whether they are process-based or VM-based), be familiar with the different platforms that support Confidential Computing (such as Intel's SGX or AMD's SEV), and have knowledge of complex concepts such as encryption and attestation.

Enarx, an open source project part of the Confidential Computing Consortium, abstracts all these complexities and makes it really easy for developers from all levels to implement and deploy applications to Trusted Execution Environments.

The Enarx project partnered with Outreachy, a diversity initiative from the Software Freedom Conservancy, to welcome three interns, who had zero knowledge of Confidential Computing. During just a few of months, they learned the basics and started building demos in their favorite language, from simple to more complex.
In this session, they'll have the opportunity to showcase their demos and share what they've learned. Our hope is to demonstrate that Confidential Computing can be made accessible and easy to use by all developers.

Nick Vidal
Profian
cloud-native
Understanding trust relationships for Confidential Computing

Confidential Computing requires trust relationships. What are they, how can you establish them, and what are the possible pitfalls? Our focus will be cloud deployments, but we will look at other environments such as telecom and Edge.

Description

Deploying Confidential Computing workloads is only useful if you can be sure what assurances you have about trust. This requires establishing relationships with various entities, and sometimes rejecting certain entities as appropriate for trust. Examples of someof the possible entities include:
- hardware vendors
- CSPs
- workload vendors
- open source communities
- independent software vendors (ISVs)
- attestation providers 

This talk will address how and why trust relationships can be established, the dangers of circular relationships, some of the mechanisms for evaluating them, and what they allow when (and if!) they are set up. It describes the foundations for considering when Confidential Computing makes sense, and when you should mistrust the claims of some of those offering it!

Mike Bursell
Profian
low-level magic
Exploring OSS guest firmware for Confidential VMs

As confidential VMs become a reality, trusted components within the guest such as guest firmware become increasingly relevant for trust and security posture of VM. In this talk, we will focus on our explorations in building “customer managed guest firmware” for increased control and auditability of CVM’s TCB.

Description

Confidential computing developers like flexibility and control over guest TCB because that allows managing what components make up the trusted code base. In a VM these requirements are tricky to meet. In this talk you will learn how in Azure we are enabling new capabilities to help you make a full VM as a Trusted Execution Environment and help your app perform remote attestation with another trusted party in a Linux VM environment with OSS guest firmware options.

Pushkar V. Chitnis
Microsoft
Ragavan Dasarathan
Microsoft
Apps & Solutions
Mystikos Python support with demo of confidential ML inference using PyTorch

In this talk, we present Mystikos project’s progress on Python programing language support and a ML workflow in a cloud environment that preserve the confidentiality of the ML model and the privacy of the inference data even if the cloud provider is not trusted. In addition, we provide demo showing how to protect the data using secret keys stored with Azure Managed HSM, and how to retrieve the keys from MHSM at run time using attestation, and how to use the keys for decryption. We also demonstrate how an application could add the secret provisioning capability with simple configurations.

Description

Confidential ML involves many stakeholders: the owner of the input data, the owner of the inference model, and the owner of the inference results, etc. Porting ML workload to Confidential Computing and managing keys and their retrieval into the Confidential Computing ML application securely and confidentially are challenging for users who have limited understanding of Confidential Computing confidentiality and security. We provide a solution implementing the heavy lifting in Mystikos runtime: the programming language runtime, the attestation, the encryption/decryption, the key provisioning etc., so that users only have to convert their python based ML applications and config their applications with a few lines of JSON code.  While the demo takes advantage of Secure Key Unwrap capability of Azure Managed HSM, the solution is based on an open framework that can be extended to other key vault providers.

Xuejun Yang
Microsoft
Apps & Solutions
Smart Contracts with Confidential Computing for Hyperledger Fabric

Fabric Private Chaincode (FPC) is a new security feature for Hyperledger Fabric that leverages Intel SGX to protect the integrity and confidentiality of Smart Contracts. This talk is a FPC 101 and will showcase the benefits of Confidential Computing in the blockchain space.

Description

Fabric Private Chaincode (FPC) is a new security feature for Hyperledger Fabric that leverages Confidential Computing Technology to protect the integrity and confidentiality of Smart Contracts.

In this talk we will learn what Fabric Private Chaincode is and how it can be used to implement privacy-sensitives use cases for Hyperledger Fabric. Our goal of this talk is to educate developers and architects with all necessary background and first hands-on experience to adopt FPC for their projects.

We start with an introduction of FPC, explaining the basic FPC architecture, security properties, and hardware requirements. We will cover the FPC Chaincode API and the applications integration using the FPC Client SDK.
The highlight of this talk will be a showcase of a new language support feature for Fabric Private Chaincode using the EGo open-source SDK.

Marcus Brandenburger
IBM Research
Apps & Solutions
Using Secure Ledger Technology to Tackle Compliance and Auditing

Secure ledger technology is enabling customers who have a need for maintaining a source of truth where even the operator is outside the trusted computing base. Top examples: recordkeeping for compliance purposes, and enable trusted data.

Description

This session will dive into how secure ledgers provide security and integrity to customers in compliance and auditing related scenarios. Specifically, customers who must maintain a source of truth which remains tamper protected, from everyone. We will also discuss how secure ledgers benefit from confidential computing and open-source.

Shubhra Sinha
Microsoft
Apps & Solutions
Unlock the mysteries of data with confidential computing powered by Intel SGX

We all understand that data sovereignty in highly regulated industries like government, healthcare, and fintech is critical, prohibiting even the most basic data insights because it cannot be moved to a centralized location for collaboration or model training. Confidential computing powered by Intel Software Guard Extensions (Intel SGX) changes all of that. Join us to learn how customers across every industry are gaining insights never before possible.

Laura Martinez
Intel
Apps & Solutions
PCI  compliance with Azure confidential computing

Storing payment data in your e-commerce site may expose your business to challenges for PCI compliance. Azure confidential computing provides a platform for protecting your customer’s financial information at scale.

Stefano Tempesta
Microsoft
Apps & Solutions
"PODfidential" Computing - Protecting Workloads with Cloud Native Scale and Agility

Balancing data privacy, runtime protection with ease and nimbleness of deployments is reality for the current state of confidential computing.
Simplicity of PODs and availability of orchestration for confidential computing, exploring the adoption of Kata POD isolation with protected virtualisation.Secure ledger technology is enabling customers who have a need for maintaining a source of truth where even the operator is outside the trusted computing base. Top examples: recordkeeping for compliance purposes, and enable trusted data.

Description

We are discussing the use of Kata POD isolation with protected virtualisation. Striving for confidential computing with a cloud native model while preserving most of the K8S compliance. This talk will summarise the state of the technical discussion in the industry, discuss solutions and open questions and give a hint into the future of confidential computing with cloud native models.Speed of adoption of confidential computing will to a large extend depend on the ease of use for developers and administrators in incorporating runtime protection into the established technology stack. From UseCases to technology demo the technology team is moving forward.

Stefan Liesche
IBM
James Magowan
IBM
6 pm - 8 pm
6 pm - 8 pm
6 pm - 8 pm
6 pm - 8 pm